Clockwork Lives Book Review

51TmxyY28AL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_When I first laid eyes upon Clockwork Lives, I was stunned by the beautiful cover. It’s a delicious red with gold writing and alchemical symbols. In fact, the markings are sort of carved on the hardcover book itself. On top of that, the paper inside feels luxurious and is given a parchment-like look. In other words, it’s incredibly aesthetically pleasing. Yet, despite the instant high regard I had for the book’s cover, it did not translate to the content of the book for me.

Basically, Clockwork Lives about a woman named Marinda. She lives in the small town/city/village (?) of Lugtown caring for her ailing father, super mechanic, Arlen Peake. As her mother, Elitia, left the family when Marinda was very young, she and her father form an incredibly close relationship; despite the fact that Arlen has some oddities about him. When Arlen dies, Marinda inherits his sizeable estate. However, there’s a catch. In order to get full access to her inheritance, Arlen stipulated that Marinda must fill a red book (much like this one) with people’s life stories. Using some sort of alchemical magic, Arlen managed to make it so that once a drop of someone’s blood hit a page in the book, their story automatically wrote itself in the book. Marinda, who prefers living a quiet, regulated, and isolated life, is understandably very upset at this development. Nonetheless, determined to get her inheritance, she undertakes the task of filling the book with stories. However, to her dismay, it turns out that the length of people’s life stories varies. In other words, one person’s story might span ten pages, as did Arlen’s, while another person’s story might just be a paragraph. Determined to fill up her book as quickly as possible (which meant that she needed to get longer life stories — aka epic lives), she journeys to her father’s hometown, Crown City, after having limited success in Lugtown.

The rest of the book details a) Marinda’s past, i.e. the situation with her mother, b) the various stories Marinda manages to collect about different characters c) the journey of self-discovery and growth Marinda embarks upon and d) the universe the book takes place. On that last point, this book is actually a sequel to Clockwork Angels, written by the same authors. I actually haven’t read Clockwork Angels, so I don’t really know what it’s about. However, what I’ve been able to glean from reading Clockwork Lives, is that this book series takes place in a steampunk alternative universe. Marinda’s country, Albion, is ruled by a leader known as the Watchmaker who apparently brought peace (“stability”) to the region and is actually centuries old. The Watchmaker figured out a way to create gold, using alchemy, and hence ensured that Albion grew prosperously. As this book is mostly for and from Marinda’s point of view, you don’t really get a big backstory for the Watchmaker. However, there are definitely a few hints as to how not everything is as rosy as it seems. There’s implications that the Watchmaker has done some terrible things. I actually found this part quite interesting and yearned for a deeper explanation of the Watchmaker’s past and activities.

On that note, I realized I forgot to talk about the format of the book. Each life story functions as a short story, thereby making this book seem like a collection of short stories. Each story is different (although quite a few of them connect!) and often has a different message (some have no messages at all). The interest level of the stories themselves also vary. I know I’ve talked before about how I don’t really like short stories because I find them lacking and prefer to read more fleshed out stories (aka The Hound of Death review). However, I actually really liked the short story format here. I think it worked really well for the book and that might actually have to do with the way the stories themselves were composed. As Arlen explained in the beginning of his story, it’s not the entirety of the life that matters, but the story that defines you/ you choose to tell. So in Arlen’s case, he wrote about how he grew to be the super mechanic he was vs. writing about his later life after he moved to Lugtown. It made for a really interesting reading experience.

In general, this was a decent enough read. I just felt like it was almost very middle-of-the-road. There were moments where Marinda’s growth and journey were incredibly inspiring. However, there were also moments where the book was just there. It’s hard to put into words, but I didn’t feel wowed by the book or anything. It was just a good enough read. The writing was decent, the plot was decent, and the implications of the book were also decent. The point of the book, or the way I understood it, was to encourage readers to live epic lives. It was to encourage readers to seek adventures, to take risks, to meet new people without fear. Again, a good and decent goal. Basically how I felt about this entire book: good and decent enough.

Sidenote — this book and the other books in this series were actually inspired by Canadian rockband Rush and their studio album named, Clockwork Angels. One of the co-authors of this book Neil Peart, is actually the drummer for Rush.

My rating: read it to enjoy some interesting short stories or as a good time pass read.

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