Ella Enchanted Book Review

24336Fun Fact: Ella Enchanted was among the first books I ever purchased for my own personal library decades ago. Also, a little embarrassed to admit this, but one of the biggest reasons I picked up this specific book, was because it had Anne Hathaway on the cover. I was/am a HUGE Princess Diaries fan and had watched her in its movie adaptation. Although I wasn’t a big fan of the movie, I did somehow, end up becoming a big fan of her. For some reason, Anne Hathaway appealed to my young self, as not only was she beautiful, but she came across as having spunk. And now that I think on it, I think this idea I had of her really affected the way I approached this book. The image I had of Anne Hathaway blended in with the characterization of Ella in the book, resulting in my forming an instant love for the spunky, strong, and smart Ella.

As I first read this book decades ago, you might be wondering why I decided to talk about it today; but there’s a reason for it. If you’ve been on my blog for a while, you’ve probably picked up on the fact that I actually haven’t reviewed any books in a long while. Aside from The Night Circus, it’s been almost five months since I reviewed one. And the reason for that, was that I had actually fallen out of love with reading. Or perhaps a better way to phrase it, would be to say that reading did not hold the same excitement for me anymore. I would pick up book and then put them down after reading two pages. It puzzled me and made me sad, as reading had been one way I defined myself for years. However, I just could not find it within me to complete a novel. Then randomly, I plucked Ella Enchanted from my personal book collection and began reading. Henceforth, almost magically, my love of reading returned! As such, I figured that I owed the book at least one review on my blog. So let us begin!

Basically, Ella Enchanted is an adaption of the Cinderella fairytale. However, in this story, she’s named Ella and doesn’t really become a scullery maid by choice. Unlike in the original fairytale, book Ella had been cursed. When she was born, a fairy gave Ella the “gift” of obedience, making it so that Ella had to obey whatever anyone said to her — including if they wanted to take advantage of her. As a result, her mother forbid her to tell of her curse to anyone. When Ella’s mother died (like in the fairytale), it was revealed that their family cook, Mandy, was also a fairy. However, she refused to reverse Ella’s “gift” out of fear that something could go wrong.

Similarly, Ella and Prince Charmont (aka Charming), don’t really first meet at a ball. Rather, they meet at her mother’s funeral and form an instant friendship (their families apparently knew each other in the book). However, their bond suffers as Ella’s father remarries and her step-mother send her off to finishing school in another country. Fed up of her step-sisters taking advantage of her curse (i.e. by commanding her to give them all her money or forcing her to miss meals by telling her to not eat), she decides to run away from school and find the fairy who cursed her in the first place. The rest of the book details Ella’s adventures after running away from finishing school, her attempts at removing her curse, and her friendship with Char.

As it’s Cinderella with a twist, the ending remains the same as the core — Ella and Charmont marry and live happily ever after. However, as it’s an adaptation, some things have been changed. One of the biggest and best changes, in my opinion, is that made of Ella’s character. While Cinderella was depicted as being kind and doing servitude quietly, Ella is feisty and determined. She’s headstrong, stubborn, and brave. Even though her curse causes her to lose her freedom (as she has to do whatever people tell her to do), she manages to find loopholes and assert her own will. It’s kind of inspiring to be honest. On top of that, she’s also incredibly talented with languages (it’s actually really cool!). She dabbles with speaking ogrese, elvish, etc.

Speaking of language, the world that Gail Carson Levine, the author of the book, manages to create is also really cool. Although the book focuses mainly on Ella and her exploits, we do get some hints as to how the magical world around her is. I’ve already mentioned the differing languages (there’s actually some pronunciations included!), but there’s also descriptions of the types of creatures, their personalities and customs, their way of living, etc. Plus, the fairy subplot that she includes is interesting as well. It really felt like the reader was on the journey with Ella, vs. just reading about how her adventures went. Levine writes in a way that is easy to read and understand. However, she also manages to include the themes of love, friendship, strength, and determination within her writing, in a way that doesn’t come across as preachy or too subtle.

I never really enjoyed Cinderella too much as she was always too passive of a heroine for me (especially in the Disney versions). However, this refashioning is one of my favourite adaptations ever. It changes Cinderella/ Ella from a meek character seeking her happily ever after to a brave one who becomes her own hero and goes after what she wants. Highly recommend this for young girls looking for a role model to emulate (or to parents who are looking for a role model for their kids).

My rating: read it to enjoy a modern, inspiring take on the Cinderella fairytale.

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