The Night Circus Book Review

NightCircus.final_.2The Night Circus is a book that my friend recommended. Well, perhaps recommend is not the right word, as she did not like the book (you can read her review here). However, she wanted another opinion on the book so she suggested that I read it. I was immediately intrigued by the cover and black and white colour scheme, plus as a fantasy fan, it seemed to be right up my alley. So I agreed and here we are today to review it.

Basically, The Night Circus, is about magic. Two magic masters, one favouring innate talent and chaos and the other favouring control, select players who compete in a “game.” The game is played at a venue (the circus being the venue in this book) and the players aren’t told much about the game; just that they are a competitor. In the end, whichever competitor remains standing, wins the game, and therefore is considered a win for the type of magical training each master favours. The two masters, Prospero the Enchanter and Mr. A. H, each select two players, Celia and Marco, respectively, and train them for years. The game begins once the two begin working for The Night Circus, which is also in fact created for the game itself and is a part of it. Once the game begins, everyone in the circus actually becomes trapped, and every move of Celia and Marco’s has repercussions for everyone involved. However, contrary to plan, once Celia and Marco discover each other, instead of competing to win, they begin collaborating with their magic and fall passionately in love in the process. The rest of the book deals with a number of things, among them: how the game between Celia and Marco ends.

As my friend didn’t really enjoy reading this book, I figured that I would be lukewarm towards it as well. However, once I began reading, I just could not put it down! I thoroughly enjoyed reading it, and thought that it was fantastically good! In fact, I’m having some trouble deciding which category I should placed this review, as I like it far more than other items in the “Liked” category, but have not quite reached “Loved” status yet. Nonetheless, let’s continue with the review!

In my opinion, the best thing about this entire book, is the writing! Erin Morgenstern is so incredibly talented with words and it really shows in this book! She manages to weave such a mesmerizing magical ambience around the story; I really felt as if I was reading a fairytale! Not the mention the beautiful imagery she evoked! I had a good time trying to imagine everything (the Ice Garden was one of my favourites!). Although I will mention that she did have the tendency to embellish things slightly too much at times. It got to the point where I had difficulty picturing everything during my initial read and had to go back and reread it.

Her love story between the two leads (competitors) was really great too! It actually felt epic during some moments, which was surprise because I did not expect that. That said, the love story did falter at times, or at least the epic feeling of it did. Actually, on second thought, I think it wasn’t so much that the love story between the leads was so great, but rather the writing that was so stellar. Because, you actually don’t really spend enough amount of time developing a connecting with the characters. The third person narration keeps you a little distant, as do the characters themselves. For example, even though we get scenes of Celia, she remains partially elusive throughout the story.

That’s actually another thing. The book is written in third person narration and actually possess multiple point-of-views (POVs). So along with some scenes of Marco, Celia, Prospero, and Mr. A. H, we also get POVs from other people in the circus, For example, we get the POV of the guy who came up with the idea of the circus, Mr. Chandresh, Marco’s ex-girlfriend Isobel, a die-hard fan of the circus, Mr. Theissen, a seemingly random boy, Bailey, etc.

However, the multiple POVs also present as a con for the book. Each chapter consisted of a POV and thus was very fragmented. On top of that, the chapters and POVs themselves were not in chronological order. Thus, you could have one entry talking about an event that happened in 1902, while the next chapter would talk about an event than happened in 1887. Furthermore, sometimes there were multiple POVs of the exact same event, that happened during the exact same time, but even then, those POVs would be separated by various entries of other dates. It was so confusing. Plus, it sucked having to go back to the previous chapter, when beginning a new one, just to figure out the time/ chronological frame of events and how it fit into the timeline. It got a little less annoying as the book grew more interesting, but even then, it was still supremely annoying.

Similarly, the over-arching story itself left a lot to be desired. I mentioned earlier how it was basically about chaos vs. control. However, this story never really got solved (perhaps that was intentional?) and there’s not much background information given on it either. It kind of just fades into the background as the book instead chooses to focus on the display of magical feats by Celia/Marco, the various events that happen in the Circus, people involved with the Circus, etc. Additionally, it is also worth pointing out that the book itself is super slow moving. It could get very boring and in the middle, it sometimes felt like a chore to continue. Although it does pick up, quite quickly in fact, near the end.

That’s actually another thing. The description of the book cover is quite misleading. There’s no grand battle of magical feats or anything. As mentioned earlier, the book itself is quite fairy tale-like. It’s mellow and possess a dream-like feeling as you read. It isn’t action-y at all, despite the fact that there are some action scenes. It’s a very slow story, but I definitely enjoyed it. There’s this very dreamy feel to it.

That said, I definitely think that this book is for a specific type of reader. Those who like hard action scenes with quick mental work probably won’t like this book, because it is just so slow and dreamy. It’s more like a puzzle you work through, that takes a while for everything to connect (and everything does connect at the end).

My rating: read it to enjoy a fantastically picturesque fairy tale with grand feats of magic and beautiful writing!

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s